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Mother and Daughter doing the Laundry Together

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Can My Foster Child Get A Job?

Getting a childhood job is a fundamental part of growing up and helps to teach many important life lessons, such as money management and providing a work ethic.

6 June 2022

There are many job options to choose from at a young age, however, there are limits to how much and when your child can work.

What Age Can My Child Start Work?

Work can begin at age 13, however, at this age, there are limitations to the hours that can be worked. For example, a child can only work 2 hours on school days as well as Sundays. At age 16, laws behind working are loosened up, however, aren’t the same as an adult. A 16-18-year-old can’t work longer than 8 hours in a 24-hour period and must work less than 40 hours a week. More information can be found by visiting the Citizens Advice Bureau

Finding A Job

There are many ways to find a job, maybe a family friend who owns a restaurant, or a family member who works at the local supermarket, however, not everyone is lucky enough to know somebody on the inside! When applying to local businesses, the traditional printed CVs and cover notes to hand into local stores in person is still a good idea. We, however, live in the modern age and checking local Facebook groups in your area can help you find local business owners promoting job vacancies. If your foster child is 16 or over, more businesses may be interested in hiring someone at that age or taking on your child as an apprentice. Creating accounts on job application websites is a great to browse what is available. Remember not to get discouraged if you don’t get a response at first. There will be many jobs that come and go, just persevere and eventually, you’ll find something worthwhile.

Limitations Of Working At A Young Age

There are many limitations of working as a young adult. There is no minimum wage in place for ages younger than 16. On top of this, there are limitations on what you can do whilst at work. To read more information on what your child can and can’t do, there is more information at the Citizens Advice Bureau Website

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